The importance of creativity and innovation with Edge of Ember’s Lynette Ong

20th April 2021 | 3 min read

Creativity, the process of generating ideas, and innovation, the exploration and outcome of those ideas, are considered essential elements for the success of any business.

So, to celebrate World Creativity and Innovation Day we spoke to ethical jewellery brand Edge of Ember’s founder and creative director Lynette Ong, whose business requires its team to push their creative boundaries to drive forward innovations.

The importance of creativity and innovation for Edge of Ember cannot be overstated.

Being an e-commerce brand means these skills are “completely embedded” in the company’s day-to-day operations, Lynette says. “We aim to constantly adapt to daily challenges and ensure we try every method possible to find the correct fit for us. Over the years this has involved a lot of trial and error, but as a team, we thrive on continually challenging ourselves creatively to be the best.”

A core part for the Edge of Ember team, no matter what department, is thinking outside of the box.

“We all have creative autonomy and the freedom to give feedback and ideas in all aspects of the business,” Lynette explains.

She adds that this is nurtured through the use of regular catch-ups and brainstorming, as it “really drives our synergy as such a close-knit team”.

These activities are key as creativity and innovation provide the business with a constant fresh outlook on the day-to-day tasks and strategy.

“Without this, we wouldn’t be able to grow as quickly or as much as a brand as we are constantly focusing on staying relevant and relatable to our customers,” she says.

“In order to be creative, we must encourage ingenuity. From creating new jewellery designs to debating the most efficient way to pack our orders, this a part of everything that we do to make sure we are not only doing the best for us as a brand but our customers who are also our global Edge of Ember ambassadors.”

An example of creativity and innovation by Edge of Ember Lynette gives is around the business wanting to create a diamond collection. However, to do this the diamonds needed to be ethically sourced as the company has been built on the foundations of the ethical production of its jewellery.

Lynette admits the firm had set themselves “quite the challenge” with this because even diamonds extracted in accordance with the Kimberley Process, which aims to remove conflict diamonds from the global supply chain, can have untraceable origins and vague supply chain details.

Edge of Ember wanted to only use alternative, guilt-free and sustainable diamonds. So, the firm decided to work with lab-grown diamonds, which are created above ground in a controlled environment that imitates what happens in the Earth’s crust to produce diamonds.

“They are physically, chemically and aesthetically identical to mined diamonds, and are graded in the same way,” Lynette says.

Edge of Ember’s its Conscious Diamond collection showcases these diamonds, which are set in 100% recycled gold, epitomising the everyday luxury that the brand is about.

For those looking to drive or maximise the creativity and innovation in their business, Lynette gives these tips: “Encourage a constructive way of working and constantly review every aspect of your business!” She adds: “Listening to other employees and obtaining genuine honest feedback can elevate any good idea into something unique and different.”